Politics Stuff

Why Are People Turned Off From Politics?


Everyone has an opinion on who should be President, but some choose to quietly sit at home and ponder this opinion rather than head out to the polling station and cast their vote. Politics has become broken for many, with millennials and blue collar workers alike feeling like there isn’t an individual who represents them. The Republican and Democrat parties have shifted to their respected extremes, and there seems to be no representation for the center ground. This isn’t solely an American issue with countries across Europe noticing a shift to the right or left. People are beginning to turn off from politics. Why?

A Dislike For The System

While the United States is hardly a despot African nation rife with corruption, people still view the American political system as flawed. In 2018 a woman who sent confidential emails from her personal account and a highly ethically suspect multi-millionaire businessman were the two choices of presidential candidate for the American public. There was very little other choice. Everyone knows that any other vote cast would be a wasted vote. The Greens don’t have the budget to stump up for a good enough campaign, and independents tend to garner protest votes and nothing more. Standing up to the establishment means to change the rules on voting.

By doing this and making every vote count rather than contributing to an electoral college system, every vote is proportional, and every member of the electorate will feel like their opinion matters.

Asking voters to cast their ballot when they don’t feel listened to is pointless. By adapting the political system, more people will become engaged with politics and a better, richer political system will emerge. This will take time and requires consultation that could even result in a change of the Constitution. However, this could be the best way to secure the future of it.

Same Old

Many people feel that it is difficult for new blood to take to the stage politically. The same dynasties and families may make up the political system and almost monopolize it to their advantage. This could be seen with the Kennedy clan in the 1960s and again with the Bush dynasty in the 1990s and noughties. Only when fresher faces are given the same backing, finances and exposure as the more established names will the system appear fairer.

Those that have tried to break through always come unstuck. This is often down to their own misdemeanors, such as the scream that brought down Howard Dean. But often, it is simply because they can’t compete with the big bucks and often ethically suspect money of other candidates. Younger people in particular want to see a transparent system where their views are acknowledged. Social media has made politics more accessible than ever, and yet more people are turning away.

By challenging the status quo and making the political system in the United States fairer, we can make people re-engage with the way they can get their voices and opinions heard.